Hip Flasks

Hip Flasks

I bought myself a porcelain hip flask and it got me to thinking about the history of these ingenious devices. The flask is the descendant of the canteen and, even older, the pilgrim bottle of medieval times (associated with the pilgrimages to the holy land, it was flat on one side and round on the other with loops around the neck to allow for a strap). European travelers in the middle ages once carried hollow gourds, leather bags or animal bladders that would serve as a canteen. It’s believed that the first flasks were used by Norwegian nomads that needed to keep warm on long journeys. The hip flask, as we would recognize it today, was most likely designed in the early 1800s. In the early 19th century, glass blowing techniques were being used to create individual...

Be Adventurous, Whiskey Drinkers! Try a Cocktail.

Be Adventurous, Whiskey Drinkers!  Try a Cocktail.

I was reminded today of the cocktail culture’s influence on whiskey sales in the United States. I know that most well-seasoned whiskey drinkers will insist on either only a few ice cubes or that their whiskey be served neat. Sometimes a whiskey drinker will refuse to order a cocktail because they aren’t sure what’s being served. I thought I’d take a moment to point out what you’re missing out on and give some explanations of what these crazy elixirs are… We all know the old fashioned that’s served in a rocks glass-that ubiquitous short glass that usually has a weighted bottom. Many cocktails will be served in a highball glass, which is a tall thin glass that most of us would get water served in when we order our whiskey neat. (A highball is just any...

Happy Turkey Day!

Happy Turkey Day!

No post today.  Just wanted to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving! Mmmmm…turkey… I’m pairing my meal with some Wild Turkey Master’s Keep. It’s only appropriate, after all.

Bourbon and Turkey!

Bourbon and Turkey!

We all know that Thanksgiving is tomorrow and turkey is on the brain…I want to make sure to include the bourbon brined turkey recipe that makes my holiday every year. I brine my turkey with a bourbon and apple cider brine. I used to use a clean bucket and fill it with my brine, but the bag that is used in this recipe helps conserve ingredients. A smaller container has more surface to liquid interaction. (Bourbon lovers can appreciate that fact- smaller barrels age whiskey faster with more wood interaction!) My recipe doesn’t have as much information as this comparable recipe on Food.com has so I decided it would be better to give you this one. The only thing I would change would be to put some apple cider in there-maybe half water, half cider....

Filibuster Whiskey from Washington D.C.

Filibuster Whiskey from Washington D.C.

Did you know that the citizens of Washington D.C. didn’t get to vote in an election until this month in 1964? (Don’t worry, I talk about whiskey in a bit..) Washington, D.C., is the only non-state to be enfranchised for presidential elections, gaining electoral votes through the ratification of the 23rd Amendment in 1961. That amendment gave the District of Columbia a share of electors proportional to its population (like the states), but limited it to no more electors than the least populous state (That’s right, D.C. and Wyoming are voting buddies!) This meant three electoral votes in 1964, and that number has not changed. Our capital is a strange place.  The U.S. Constitution provided for a federal district under the exclusive jurisdiction of the Congress and...