Why is there a Tax Strip on my Whiskey Bottle?

Why is there a Tax Strip on my Whiskey Bottle?

What is a tax strip and why is it on the cap of my whiskey? Tax strips are the bit of paper that were affixed over the cap/cork to indicate that the tax had been paid and the bottle has not been tampered with. Red strips denote federal tax, blue strips are for export, and green strips denote bottled in bond. There is sometimes a state tax paper stamp on the shoulder of the bottle. State tax stamps changed every four years when new state treasurers were appointed. The use of tax strips over the cap began after the Bottled in Bond Act in 1897. It was a green decorative strip that showed the public that the whiskey within the bottle was 100 proof, bottled by one distiller in one distilling season and was at least 4 years old. (not to mention paid its taxes on its...

Barrel Sizes

Barrel Sizes

I thought I’d follow up yesterday’s post with a list of barrel sizes for reference. The English Tun (259 gallons) twice the size of a butt and 6 brewery barrels Gorda (185 gallons) Made from American oak (Quercus alba) Used for marrying whiskeys or vatting them together Madeira Drum (172 gallons) Made from very thick staves of European oak (Quercus robur). short and fat. Used in the madeira wine industry. Sometimes used for finishing whiskies. Port Pipe (172 gallons) Also made from thick staves of European oak (Quercus robur). This one is long and narrow. Used in port wine industry. Sometimes used to finish whisky Machine Puncheon (132 gallons) Made from American oak (Quercus alba). 1/3 of a tun. Short and fat. Used mostly in the rum industry. Sometimes used for...