Why So Defensive About Sourced Whiskey?

Why So Defensive About Sourced Whiskey?

I was asked at the Dram Devotee’s Whistle Pig tasting on Thursday, “Why do you sound so defensive when you are speaking about sourced whiskey?” It must be true that I sound defensive or it wouldn’t have been noted by one of my guests.  I can tell you that a lot of my defensiveness stems from the commentary that I read on the internet.  I suppose I do feel the need to defend those companies that source their bourbons and ryes, but also manage to put out a consistently great product. I’ve seen all the lists of sourced whiskeys from LDI/MGP (Lawrenceburg Distillers Indiana/Midwest Grain Products).  (For those that have not seen the list, you can find information here- (http://recenteats.blogspot.com/p/the-complete-list-of-american-whiskey.html.) There is a lot...

What is “Mountain Dew”?

What is “Mountain Dew”?

Did you know that “Mountain Dew” soda was invented by two brothers in Tennessee to be a chaser for whiskey? Here’s a great story for you.. http://vinepair.com/win…/mountain-dew-extreme-whiskey-mixer/

Whiskey Stereotypes Debunked

Whiskey is not more “dangerous” than wine or beer. I know that may sound silly to say, but this has been an American cultural claim that I feel needs addressing. Generally speaking, whiskey is one of the healthiest forms of alcoholic beverages. Our culture has often pigeonholed whiskey drinkers as “hard drinkers” and that is an unfair stereotype. The association with alcoholism and whiskey has connections that go back well before prohibition, but they are still with us today. The myths and biases about whiskey are embedded in our society. Even Thomas Jefferson thought wine was culturally superior to whiskey! We can, however, educate ourselves about the realities and distance ourselves from these myths. The ethanol in whiskey is the same ethanol that is found in...

Laphroaig’s Team

Laphroaig’s Team

Got to meet John Campbell,master distiller, and Simon Brooking, Brand Ambassador, for Laphroaig last night. What a pleasure it was to talk whisky with them. Mr.Brooking and his secret stash allowed for a dram of Bowmore’s Devil’s Cask as well…beautiful. I was properly chastised for not having become a member of the “Friends of Laphroaig”. It is very easy to join and get updates on new releases and claim “your own square foot of Islay.” (pronounced Eye-leh) It’s true! You actually get a dedicated square foot of earth that is mapped by GPS. On visiting the distillery and Islay, you can plant you flag, sculpture, plaque, etc. on your plot once you locate it! All you have to do is buy a bottle of Laphroaig and the...

Can We All Stop Talking Trash About Canadian Whisky Now?

Can we all stop talking trash about Canadian whisky now? 70% of Canadian whisky is shipped to the United States for sale. About 90% of the “good stuff” produced in Canada never leaves Canada. So what then? Seems we Americans are left with the short end of the stick, eh? We hold a grudge against Canada for some reason. Too many 7&7s were served in the 80’s and too many of our fathers (or grandfathers) drank Canadian Club in the 60’s, I guess (I’m talking to you, Don Draper!). The fact is that a lot of Americans don’t even know that they love a Canadian whiskey! Texas is the largest market for Crown Royal. (I actually have a Texas Ranger in my family that refuses to drink anything except Crown and Coke. I don’t have the heart to tell him…)...

Old Taylor Distillery Returns…

Old Taylor Distillery is coming back to us! The Old Taylor Distillery was built in 1877 by Colonel Edmund Haynes Taylor, Jr. as his own “personal castle” distillery. The place is practically a medieval fortress! E.H.Taylor not only had plenty of experience in owning and operating distilleries by this time, but he also had toured many European distilleries, as well, and applied that knowledge to Old Taylor’s construction. He was now using rollers instead of mill stones to get more consistent mash. He was using copper mashtuns and made his own barrels -even experimenting with smaller barrels! This was the first distillery to build ricks in warehouses seperating the barrels from one another and allowing the barrels to “breathe”. (instead of stacking them...

Dram Devotees Are On BucksCountyAlive.com!

Bucks County, PA is embracing whiskey and getting excited about the WHISKEY BOOM! Bucks County Alive’s website is engaging whiskey lovers and taking part in the whiskey craze that’s taking place throughout the country! I worked with the wonderful people at Bucks County Alive to create a whiskey trail to follow all around the eastern half of Pennsylvania. There is so much to see and so many whiskeys to try. Get out there and visit a local distillery! Not only does it make an amazing day trip, but it broadens your palate and your connection to local distillers that embrace local products and grains… Bucks County Alive September 2 · Craft distilling is booming in the Philadelphia area! Before Prohibition, Pennsylvania had the country’s densest...

Japanese Whiskey

I am a huge fan of Japanese whisky… Two of the most influential figures in the history of Japanese whisky are Shinjiro Torii and Masataka Taketsuru. Torii created the Yamazaki distillery in 1924 to bring Japanese whisky to the Japanese people. Taketsuru studied whisky making in Scotland until moving back to Japan in the 1920’s (with his Scottish bride) and began work as a distillery executive for Torii. In 1934 Masataka Taketsuru left to create his own distillery, which would become Nikka. Japanese whisky is based on Scottish traditional methods of distillation. I don’t know how many of you are familiar with Japanese tea ceremony, but I can assure you that it is no easy task to learn its methods and intricacies. (My best friend studies the art...