Stoll & Wolfe

Stoll & Wolfe

There are many new distilleries popping up in Pennsylvania, but none carry the Pennsylvanian distillery torch quite like Stoll and Wolfe. You see the name Stoll and Wolfe, which is named after founders of the brand, Dick Stoll and Erik Wolfe, was originally named Bomberger’s as a tribute to the old Bomberger’s Distillery (known to most as Michter’s). They planned to reopen the distillery in Lititz, PA where Mr. Dick Stoll was distiller in the 70’s. Mr. Stoll is now famous for being the man behind the famous A.H.Hirsch Reserve 16 year old bourbon that every collector longs to own. The attempt to resurrect the Bomberger’s brand was not to be, however. Michter’s brand name was already owned by Chatham Imports in Kentucky. A lawsuit kept the brand name in limbo for a...

Dad’s Hat Rye in PA

Dad’s Hat Rye in PA

One of the whiskey distilleries that deserves a closer look in Pennsylvania is Mountain Laurel Spirits, makers of Dad’s Hat Rye.  While so many whiskey distilleries began to introduce spirits other than whiskey to the market, Mountain Laurel Spirits only ever intended to produce rye whiskey.  Every ounce of spirit they create with their German-made pot still goes into barrels to become Dad’s Hat Rye. Dad’s Hat Rye was the brainchild of Herman Mihalich, who grew up immersed in and around his family’s bar in Monessen, Pa.  He studied Chemical Engineering at UPenn, where he would meet most of the partners he would incorporate into Mountain Laurel Spirits.  He gained experience in the workplace after school in pharmaceuticals, flavor and fragrance, but would return...

New Distilleries in Pennsylvania

New Distilleries in Pennsylvania

The American Whiskey Convention in Philadelphia was a bit of an inspiration for me to spend a bit more time discussing the boom in whiskey distilling here in Pennsylvania.  The “White Dog Row” element of the Convention showed off 11 new make spirits from 8 different local distilleries.  White whiskey is the backbone of any distillery.  It shows the character of the grain, the flavors contributed by the yeasts and the potential of the spirit.  No amount of aging can fix a bad white whiskey foundation.  I think it was important to highlight the potential of our local distilleries through their white dogs.  It also gave a chance for the distillers and representatives from those distilleries to speak directly to the public about their work and their visions for the...

Women and Whiskey

Women and Whiskey

I read an article on Facebook today on the 8 reasons to date a whiskey drinking woman.  These types of articles always make me smile, at first, because I’m a whiskey drinking woman and all of these descriptions seem complimentary. (Reasons to date girls that drink whiskey) Then it makes me wonder…why are these stereotypes around? Who are these mysterious women that society has conjured up? Whiskey has a reputation in America as a bad boy or bad girl drink.  When it’s not seen as the drink of choice served to cowboys and criminals, it’s seen as the neat rocks glass drink served in dark smoky rooms filled with leather chairs and wealthy men.  Now it’s sultry women with secrets that don’t like commitment.  Whiskey has a long history in this country and...

The Amazing Booker Noe

The Amazing Booker Noe

  I can’t stress this enough.  Booker Noe was an incredible man. The titans that paved the way for the modern bourbon age that we find ourselves in were not CEOs or marketing strategists.  They were country boys with a love for bourbon.  Before Prohibition, wealthy tycoons like Colonel Blanton, Colonel E.H.Taylor, Isaac Wolfe Bernheim and Samuel Bronfman led the way.  After the bourbon collapse of the brown spirits market in the 60’s and 70’s, it was largely the perseverance of a few (now legendary) Kentucky distillers that brought bourbon back.  Booker Noe was one of those men. Frederick Booker Noe II was the grandson of the famous Jim Beam.  He was born in 1929 and was the son of Jim Beam’s daughter, Margaret Noe.  Booker began helping at the distillery as...