The Cost of Prohibition for Pennsylvania

The Cost of Prohibition for Pennsylvania

While it is slowly becoming common knowledge that Pennsylvania is the birthplace of American whiskey, I’m often asked, ”Why is Pennsylvania only now showing signs of distilling life again?” The truth lies in the duration and aftermath of Prohibition. In 1899, there were close to 965 distilleries in the country with about 400 of them located in Pa. By 1914, that number had been reduced to 434, and by Prohibition, there were only 27-33 left. (ref.- http://www.bottlebooks.com/american%20medicinal%20spirits%20company/american_medicinal_spirits_compa.htm) Consolidation and the shuttering of so many distilleries left the distilling industry on the brink of collapse. The reality was that the political will and capital that remained in support of distilling would begin...

Old Overholt and Its Roots in Bucks County

Old Overholt and Its Roots in Bucks County

Did you know that Old Overholt Rye Whiskey has historic roots in Bucks County? Abraham Overholt, the founder of the West Overton Distilling Co. and creator of Old Farm whiskey, was the son of Henry and Anna Overholt of Bucks County. (There are still many Overholt descendants still living in Bedminster, Plumsteadville, Deep Run, Blooming Glen, Perkasie, Dublin, and other towns throughout Bucks County.) In In the 1850’s, the Overholts opened a second distillery in Broad Ford, Pa. They made Old Monongahela Whiskey and, later, Old Overholt after Abraham’s death (possibly named in his honor). They were able to remain open during Prohibition by making medicinal whiskeys. The last Overholt descendant to own the brand was Henry Clay Frick- millionaire...