Jim Beam’s “Small Batch” Collection

Jim Beam’s “Small Batch” Collection

Jim Beam is one of the most famous names in the American whiskey world. The historic roots of the Beam family cover over 200 years in bourbon making, but the Jim Beam brand name actually dates back to 1933 when James Beauregard Beam (Jim Beam) built the family’s Clermont distillery (after Prohibition) near Bardstown. Jim Beam, the great-grandson of the patriarch of the Beam family, Jacob Boehm, was responsible for keeping the Beam’s bourbon legacy alive after Prohibition ended. A second, larger distillery was later built about 9-10 miles away in Boston, KY in 1953. Jim Beam’s grandson, Booker Noe Jr., was responsible for launching Jim Beam’s small batch collection. Blanton’s (created by Elmer T. Lee in 1984 at the George T.Stagg Distillery) had created the first...

Poor Old Crow…When Will You Get Your Due?

Poor Old Crow…When Will You Get Your Due?

Poor Old Crow…when will you get your due? Old Crow bourbon long ago fell to the bottom shelf. It uses the same mash bill and yeast as Jim Beam, but is only aged for 3 years and not as much interest is put into its taste profile. Old Crow Reserve gets a bit more love by being aged for 4 years and is bottled at 86 proof instead of the industry standard 80 that Old Crow is brought down to. This historic American whiskey is named after James Crow, the Steve Jobs of bourbon! Dr. James C. Crow (chemist/physician- with a medical degree from Edinburgh University) was originally from Inverness, in Scotland. He first moved to Philadelphia and then down to Woodford County, Kentucky in the 1820’s. He began working on new methods for distillation while working for...

Industry Camaraderie

Industry Camaraderie

One of the things I have always loved about the whiskey industry is the camaraderie. The success of the whole industry comes before any one individual. On November 7, 1996, Heaven Hill’s production plant in Bardstown was almost completely destroyed by fire. The fire started in an aging warehouse and spread to other buildings and vehicles. 90,000 barrels of flammable bourbon were consumed. A “river of fire” flowed from the warehouses. The next day, business at the plant resumed. The bottling line was still operational and they still had stocks that needed to fill orders. The production end was crippled, however, and there were gaps in inventory. In many other businesses, competitors would leave a struggling company to sink or swim. Kentucky...

The Beam Family Tree

A serious family tree for a serious whiskey family. The whiskey industry owes a dept to this prolific family. Let’s hope they continue to bring new distillers and managers and the like into the industry for a long time to...