History of Rebel Yell in America

History of Rebel Yell in America

Rebel Yell is one of those old throwbacks. A wheated bourbon. And yes, it was made along side Pappy Van Winkle at Stitzel-Weller. The brand has changed hands and recipes, but it is a part of American bourbon history. The brand was established after Prohibition in the 1940’s. The bottle may claim 1849, but that is when W.L. Weller & Sons company was founded. Charles R. Farnsley (a former mayor of Louisville) created the brand for the Stitzel-Weller company, with the idea to distill it in limited batches for exclusive distribution in the south. Lucky for him, his uncle was co-owner of the company, Alex Farnsley. It seems he originally created the whiskey for himself and to give as gifts, but the label went public in the 60’s to commemorate the Civil War...

Corks- Why Are They Still Used?

Corks- Why Are They Still Used?

Why is cork still used to seal whiskey bottles? Seems like a bad idea in the modern times we live in. Collectors know that one should only store whiskey bottles upright on the shelf. Unlike wine, wet corks are bad for whiskey. Cork, in commercial use, is usually harvested from Quercus suber, also called the Cork Oak. Now, we all know that oak is the material used in barrel production. What happens to oak when whiskey interacts with its surface? The flavors in the oak are imparted into the solution. Here in lies one of the troubles. Do you want your whiskey to taste like cork by interacting with it? Our next problem comes from the fact that the cork is adhered to a plastic cap in most cases. That cap is held on by glue. Now your whiskey will have subtle notes of...

The Science of Nosing

Why does my bourbon smell like vanilla? There’s no added flavorings or additives, right? Correct. Bourbon can not have anything added to it like colorings or flavor additives. The vanilla you smell is in its chemistry… You may read tasting notes that look like this (for Elijah Craig 12 year old)… “Nose: Quite thick and full. There is a beautiful sweetness with notes of toasty oak, toffee, spicy stewed fruits, a touch of resin and a lovely crème anglaise character. Palate: Full and sublimely smooth with notes if stewed Bramley apples, malmsey, a touch of aniseed and a hint of spice. Finish: Good length with toasty oak notes and a creamy sweetness.” What does that mean? How can whiskey taste like toffee or apples? Let me start by saying that...

Cigars and Whisky -A Perfect Pair

Cigars and Whisky -A Perfect Pair

Cigars and whiskey go so well together… They have a lot more in common then how well they pair together… Whiskey production goes through many stages of development. Malting, milling, mashing, fermenting, distilling and aging. Tobacco goes through similar processes as well. Harvesting, curing, fermenting, aging, blending and rolling. Whiskey grains need to malted, which is the process of tricking a seed into waking up and activating its enzymes that will break carbohydrates in the seed down into sugars. Tobacco, when it is dried, or cured, the leaf loses moisture and releases its natural sugars. Whiskey grains then are ground and cooked at specific temperatures to extract soluble sugars from the mash. Tobacco leaves are left to dry naturally in...

How Do I Love Whiskey? Let Me Count the Ways…

How do I love American Whiskey? Let me count the ways… 1. Bourbon Whiskey. -I almost thought to just leave it at that. -Bourbon was made a distinctly American product in 1964. -Made of at least 51% corn, flavored with either rye or wheat grains, and barley, it is a sweeter robust whiskey and has become huge for collectors and drinkers alike the world over. -Corn is as American as it gets and bourbon flaunts it proudly! 2.Rye Whiskey. -Used to be that when you said you wanted rye, you were getting a Canadian product. Not anymore! Rye is back, baby! -Rye whiskey was the whiskey that George Washington made! -Rye whiskey has its roots in Pennsylvania. Scots-Irish immigrants found that rye grew much more easily in PA soil and adopted the grain in their whiskey...