White Corn is in the Mashbill

Did you know that the original recipe for Old Taylor called for an heirloom white corn, not yellow corn? Generally bourbon made today uses feed corn in their recipes because it’s the least expensive and can be bought in large quantities. White corn, for distilling, has been described as having less taste than yellow corn, but that is debatable. When tests were done to discover the original composition of pre-Prohibition Old Taylor bourbon, they found that white corn was used. Distilling is an art as well as a science, and master distiller/chemical engineer, Marianne Barnes, will be working with these original recipes to create her whiskeys at her new home, the distillery once known as Old Taylor. She was the lead blender for the special release Old Forester...

There Were No “Old” American Whiskeys Before 1958…

Did you know that there were no American whiskeys over 8 years old before 1958? Modern perceptions are that older whiskey is better whiskey. That is purely a marketing scheme. Picture the whiskey industry after WWII. The few distilleries that remained after prohibition had been successful with pulling themselves out of a whiskey drought by producing massive amounts of young whiskey and blending older stocks with neutral grain spirits. People were drinking straight whiskey again and the whiskey industry was successful until WWII ended production in order to massively produce ethanol for the war effort. The whiskey monopolies (including Schenley) were experiencing another whiskey shortage due to the war. Jump to the beginning of 1950 and the build up to the Korean...