Why Do Copper Pot Stills Look So Different?

Why do copper pot stills always look so different? Every still produces a different whiskey. Alembic stills (the ones that look like copper cauldrons with elephant trunks…) have been around since the Egyptians were using them to make perfume! The mixture of water and grain that has been fermented to create distiller’s beer is loaded into the base (cauldron) and heated to separate the alcohol from the solution through evaporation. It’s pretty simple, actually. The boiling point of alcohol is lower than water and the rest of the mixture so that will evaporate first. The mash (fermented grains) go in at about 8-10% alcohol and come out after the first run through the still at 25-30% alcohol. That 25-30% alcohol solution that comes out of the first run is...

Needs More Beautiful Copper…

Copper is beautiful. It seems to glow in the sunlight and somehow evokes warmth and well-being in us. Perhaps that’s why I always want to hug a still when I see one…or perhaps it’s the whiskey… In 1999, when Charlie Downs and Craig Beam moved Heaven Hill operations to the Bernheim distillery in Louisville (after the devastating fire at their Bardstown distillery in 1996), they discovered that the six story column stills on the new site would need some tweaking to produce the whiskey they wanted. Not only did they have to drill out bigger holes to let the beer flow properly, but found they needed more copper. Copper is essential in creating good whiskey because it reacts with and removes dimethyl trisulfide and other sulfur containing...