White Corn is in the Mashbill

Did you know that the original recipe for Old Taylor called for an heirloom white corn, not yellow corn? Generally bourbon made today uses feed corn in their recipes because it’s the least expensive and can be bought in large quantities. White corn, for distilling, has been described as having less taste than yellow corn, but that is debatable. When tests were done to discover the original composition of pre-Prohibition Old Taylor bourbon, they found that white corn was used. Distilling is an art as well as a science, and master distiller/chemical engineer, Marianne Barnes, will be working with these original recipes to create her whiskeys at her new home, the distillery once known as Old Taylor. She was the lead blender for the special release Old Forester...

Mash Bills in America

Did you know that mash bills are really only used in American whiskey production? American distilleries refer to the proportions of grains used as their “mash bill”. There are quite a few distinct styles of traditional American Whiskeys. Pennsylvania style ryes traditionally carry over 80% rye in their mash bills. Traditional Maryland style ryes are closer to 60% rye, balancing the mash bill with corn and a small amount of malted barley. (George Washington’s original rye whiskey from Mt. Vernon was 60% rye, 35% corn and 5% malted barley.) Bourbon, called “America’a spirit”, is at least 51% corn and is flavored with either rye or wheat grains and a small amount of malted barley. Corn whiskey is at least 80% corn, usually more. These traditional mash bills grew...