The Taft Decision

The Taft Decision

Did you know that President Taft is responsible for defining “what is whiskey?” E.H. Taylor with the help of John G. Carlisle, then the Secretary of the Treasury, enabled the passing of the Bottled in Bond Act of 1897 to help eliminate the widespread adulteration of whiskey. In 1906, during Teddy Roosevelt’s administration, the Pure Food and Drug Act was passed. This caused arguments between the two big whiskey producing factions, however. Harvey Wiley, the chief of the Department of Agriculture’s Bureau of Chemistry and a leader in passing of the Pure Food and Drug Act, believed that whiskey was a distilled spirit from grain that was aged in oak barrels with only pure water used to adjust the proof. The rectifiers, those whiskey producers...

Old Forester-The First Bourbon Bottled in the U.S.

Did you know that Old Forester was the first bourbon exclusively sold in bottles? In 1874, salesman-turned-distiller George Garvin Brown, in Marion County, Kentucky, first bottled his own “Old Forester” Straight Bourbon Whisky (this brand has no “e” for whatever reason) in labeled and sealed bottles (seems a bit late to get around to this seeing as industrial bottle production started around 1815). Whiskey had moved from the barrel to the bottle! The idea swept the industry because it created trust between the salesperson and the consumer. Think about it- there’s no tampering with a sealed bottle! Before the 1870’s most whiskey was sold in barrels and glazed jugs. In glass bottles, you can see the finished products’...