Learning From History

Learning From History

I strongly believe that those of us that don’t learn from history are doomed to repeat it. That goes for ourselves and our nation. The only amendment to the Constitution of the United States that diminished our freedom was the 18th Amendment. It took almost 100 years to fan the flames of temperance into the fire of alcohol prohibition in our country. The road to Prohibition, it seems, may have been paved with good intentions, but a very vocal few, ultimately, determined the fate of America in the early twentieth century. Many things factored into our country adopting Prohibition as the law of the land. Right up until the Industrial Revolution in the late 19th century, drinking water was still not widely available. Digging deep, freshwater wells would need the...

“Old Hickory” and “The Hickoryites”

“Old Hickory” and “The Hickoryites”

Andrew Jackson was an interesting character. He was born to Scots-Irish immigrants (most likely landing first in Philadelphia) somewhere between the border of North and South Carolina in 1767. He was an orphan without siblings by the age of 14. His eldest brother, Hugh, died during the Revolution and his other brother, Robert, died of smallpox after he and Andrew had been held captives of the British. You can imagine how losing your family at so young an age would begin to harden the man. Jackson may not have come from wealth, but his years as a frontier lawyer down in Tennessee certainly changed that. He would go on to have a distinguished career as a lawyer, a judge, a politician and a land speculator. His purchase of the Hermitage, his plantation near...

Is Beer More Varied Than Whiskey?

Is Beer More Varied Than Whiskey?

Last night I found myself in defense of whiskey!  A conversation arose about how much variety exists in whiskey and someone said, ”Beer is much more varied than whiskey…”  I found myself arguing how that was not true, but then had a take a moment to realize that most people do not have as much experience with whiskey as they do with beer.  This is due, in part, to the fact that the beer revolution has become a part of the mainstream for bar culture nowadays.  Beer drinkers in metropolitan areas are much more likely to order a foreign beer or a micro-brew than the “standard domestics” like Coors or Bud.  Some will even look down their noses at you if you choose to drink “corporate beer.” The same cannot necessarily be said for whiskey drinkers (except for the...